PRIMITIVE FIRE HACK!

Get Results Faster And More Consistently
With A “Host Spindle” / “Composite Spindle”


The bow drill and hand drill techniques for creating fire are two of the quintessential primitive fire techniques that many wilderness survival and bushcraft enthusiasts use to measure their primitive skills and demonstrate their survival/bushcraft “prowess” to others. This is particularly the case with the hand drill fire starting method as it is even more challenging than the bow drill method.


While technique is absolutely critical in both the bow drill and hand drill fire starting methods (especially with the hand drill technique), technique is not what this particular article is about. In many cases the issue of technique is
completely moot if you are working with the wrong materials.


This article has one very specific purpose:

I want to share with you a sort of bow drill/hand drill “cheat” that will help you get results with both primitive fire methods on numerous fronts:

  • You’ll spend far less time looking for the perfect materials for your bow drill/hand drill sets
  • You’ll spend far less time processing materials and making bow drill/hand drill sets
  • You’ll get to spend far more time actually developing your primitive fire skills and techniques!
  • You’ll have the ability to experiment with various different materials quickly and easily with far less work!
  • You’ll learn, improve and get results from your primitive fire efforts much more quickly!
  • You’ll achieve success more easily, quickly and consistently with either primitive fire starting method!

If you are interested in mastering either (or both) primitive fire making methods more quickly, more easily, and get results consistently without having to constantly fuss with making bow drill or hand drill sets, then I’d encourage you to keep reading!

THE PROBLEM:

Finding the perfect materials for your bow drill/hand drill set (particularly in terms of your hearth and spindle) with all of the properties we need to achieve success can be a challenge in and of itself. While hearth material is a very important variable in this equation, finding suitable hearth board materials is less of a challenge than finding suitable spindle material. Finding the perfect piece of wood or plant stalk is much more of a challenge. Let’s take a look at what we need in a spindle:


Length

(This is more of a challenge for hand drill kits because your spindle has to be even longer than what is required for a bow drill)

Diameter

(This can be overcome by multiple small diameter bundled together)

Strength

Dryness

Hardness/Softness

Straightness


It can be tricky to find a single piece of wood or plant that has ALL of these properties! And in a very real survival situation, you may not actually be able to afford the time it takes you to find a single piece of material with all of these qualities… and sometimes you may THINK you found a piece of material with all of these qualities only to discover that you did not! (Wood is too hard, too soft, breaks during use, etc.) Now that time was totally wasted and you have spend even more time looking for a replacement spindle!


THE SOLUTION: 
Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket”!


What if you didn’t really need to find a single piece of material that possesses ALL of these qualities.
What if you could find a terrific piece of wood that was long, straight, and strong but it just didn’t have to have all of those friction fire properties we are looking for (dryness, hardness, softness, etc.)… but you DID find a piece of wood that DOES have those other properties only… it’s not very long, very straight or strong? Man… if you could only magically combine those two pieces of wood into one SUPER spindle!! How great would that be??


Well… you absolutely can!! Enter the “Host Spindle” or “Composite Spindle”!


Check it out for yourself!:

 

Hand Drill & Bow Drill “Host Spindle” / “Composite Spindle” Introduction:
Construction & Materials

 

Hand Drill & Bow Drill “Host Spindle” / “Composite Spindle” And “Parasite Plugs”

Author: Josh Nieten

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